Seattle Storm player season review: Alysha Clark

The versatile forward put forth what was arguably her best season yet in 2020

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Alysha Clark #32 of the Seattle Storm plays defense against the Minnesota Lynx on September 6, 2020, at Feld Entertainment Center in Palmetto, Florida. (Photo by Stephen Gosling/NBAE via Getty Images)

Was 2020 the best season of Alysha Clark’s impressive career? There’s an argument to be made that Clark has never been better.

Despite the delayed start to the season and grueling schedule, Clark set career highs in efficiency and points, assists, steals, and blocks per game. Oh, and 4.2 rebounds per game was the second-highest mark of her career.

Moreover, the Storm allowed just 97.1 points per 100 possessions (exceptional) with Clark on the floor. For her defensive effort, Clark was named to her second WNBA All-Defensive Team. Clark was one of only two unanimous selections this season.

One of the most impressive things about Clark’s game is that she doesn’t do it with a ton of flash or requires the team to run many plays for her. Clark often gets her touches within the flow of the offense. You would think that wouldn’t be the case for a player who led the WNBA in 3-point efficiency and had the third-best 2-point field goal percentage.

No, Clark does whatever the team needs her to do from catch-and-shoot jumpers, a tough defensive assignment, or crashing the boards. She’s far from the only player on the roster sacrificing personal numbers for team success, but Clark is always ready for a pass and consistently made good decisions. Clark is almost always in the right place at the right time, like this Game 1 buzzer-beater against Minnesota.

There can’t be many things more dejecting than forcing the ball from Breanna Stewart or Jewell Loyd’s hands only to have Clark drill a 3-pointer from the corner. Opponents can’t help off her, either, because she’s such a strong shooter.

Having players who make few mistakes and know where to be, goes a long way. Those same players possessing immense skill helps too.

Unfortunately for the Storm, Clark is among the core players in need of a new contract this offseason and next. At age 32, Clark would likely prefer to stay in her only WNBA home and Seattle likely feels the same.

After the season Clark had, it would be hard to not do everything to re-sign her.